1960 S Research Paper

The collection offers a wealth of information from Roth's early career at the University of Pittsburgh, including his research and correspondence from that period, as well as drafts of some of his well-cited articles and writings. Approximately one-half of the material lies in the Correspondence and Working Papers series. This portion of the collection, arranged alphabetically by correspondent, includes professional correspondence as well as many drafts of scholarly articles. This arrangement replicates Roth's original filing system, which offers insight into his correspondence style and methodology for economics collaboration. Notable correspondents include Roy Weintraub, Robert Aumann, Ido Erev, Uriel Rothblum, and many more. Also included are various subject files, including Winner's Curse, Matching, and Learning.

Another notable component of the collection is Roth's Writings and Research, which includes both working drafts of Roth's own as well as data printouts and other components of his work in game theory and its real-world applications. These files have been grouped by article and are loosely arranged by date. Each article's co-writers or collaborators are noted if known.

The Writings by Others series has some overlap with the Correspondence and Working Drafts series, but for the most part the former includes only the article from Roth's fellow economists, without the collaborative or feedback aspect present in the latter series.

Roth's Teaching and Coursework series includes lecture notes as well as tools such as transparencies used during his economics lectures. Roth's own coursework at Stanford is also present, including notes, exams, syllabi, and lectures on topics such as microeconomics, competitive strategies, game theory, and choice theory.

Finally, the Grant Materials series is arranged by grant application, with each file including application materials, correspondence, reports, and finances relating to the grant.

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 2 full business days in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

 Access to the Collection

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

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The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

More copyright and citation information

How to Cite

[Identification of item], Alvin Roth Papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Contents of the Collection

 

1.Correspondence and Working Papers, 1970s-1990s

12 boxes

Roth's files of correspondence and working papers, arranged alphabetically by last name. Files largely consist of professional correspondence between Roth and fellow economists around the world, and usually include copies of a working paper or other scholarship. There are occasional subject files interspersed as well. Most files date from the late 1970s through the early 1990s.

 

Box 1

 

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Aumann, Robert J.

Addditional legal-sized correspondence is housed in Box 18.

Box 1

 

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Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences

Box 3

 

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Harrington, Joseph E., Jr.

Box 5

 

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Hoffman, Elizabeth

(2 folders)

Box 6

 

Jaycees-TOYM (Ten Outstanding Young Men)

Box 7

 

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Leopold-Wildburger, Ulrike

Box 8

 

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Miscellaneous correspondence, 1985-1986

Box 8

 

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Publishers' correspondence, 1984-1998

Box 9

Creating A Solid Research Paper About The 1960s: Tips For Undergraduate Students

A research paper is a daunting task. It can seem overwhelming and even a little terrifying when you begin the process. The basic tips for any research paper are the same. Do not procrastinate. Research your topic thoroughly. Start by getting a basic outline going well before you sit down to write. Proofread carefully for all spelling and grammar mistakes. Writing a solid paper about the 1960s can be fun. It was a turning point for most of the world. Here are some topics to really think about.

  • This is the decade that saw a turning point for racial equality. The 60s was big for the Civil Rights. There were marches and laws that did not address all the problems. Finding out what and who made the real difference can make your paper come alive. Examining how this decade was so important for African Americans can help you develop your topic.
  • The war in Vietnam impacted the whole generation. There was no denying that people are still feeling the impact today. You can use your paper to research why the war happened and what the true effect it had on those who participated in the war.
  • The assassination of a beloved president. There are many skeptics that believe that this assassination was crucial to the evolvement of America.
  • Women’s group took some serious stands for equal pay. Some know it as the bra burning age. Delve into this and see what difference was made real.
  • 1968, in particular, is said to be a monumental year for America and their ideas. They seem to give up some of the idealism and focus on other things.

There is no reason to be nervous about tackling the 1960s. It was an exciting time in history. It seems that between everything that was going on the turning points did not seem to be as groundbreaking as it truly was. There are many places that you can dig into and break open. Just remember to find your topic early so that you have a chance to catch lectures, enjoy papers, and further research in depth. You will find it a lot easier to put together your paper if you set goals for when you plan to have each step completed. If you take the time to find a topic that will grab you; it will show.

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