Using My 3 Contract Abroad Assignment

3 FAM 4120 

EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES ABROAD

(CT:PER-804;   02-01-2016)
(Office of Origin: HR/ER)

3 FAM 4121  GENERAL

3 FAM 4121.1  Applicability

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service employees)

a. All U.S. Government employees of participating agencies while abroad; and

b. All employees subject to the control of the Chief of Mission.

3 FAM 4121.2  Authority

(CT:PER-804;   02-01-2016)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

a. 22 U.S.C. 3927;

b. 22 U.S.C. 4343; and

c.  The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

3 FAM 4121.3  Relationship to Government-Wide Standards of Ethical Conduct

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

The rules in this subchapter are in addition to the rules of Ethical Conduct found in 5 CFR 2635, and take into account foreign policy considerations and treaty and statutory obligations.

3 FAM 4121.4  Delegation of Authority

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

The Chief of Mission may delegate any authority granted in this subchapter.

3 FAM 4122  GIFTS AND DECORATIONS FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

Employees and their spouses (unless separated) and their dependents may accept gifts and/or decorations from foreign governments only under the restrictions published in 22 CFR chapter 1, part 3.

3 FAM 4122.1  Guidelines

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

a. An employee abroad who has been offered a gift (other than meals, refreshments or entertainment) by a private individual or organization that cannot be personally accepted under 5 CFR 2635, Subpart B or under other authority may accept it on behalf of the Department of State, or if employed by another agency which has gift acceptance authority, on behalf of that agency, if refusal, reimbursement at the fair market value, or return would cause offense or embarrassment or otherwise adversely affect the foreign relations of the United States.

b. An employee abroad may accept a gift of meals, refreshment or entertainment by a private individual or organization as provided in 5 CFR 2635.204(i).

c.  Gifts accepted pursuant to section 3 FAM 4122.1a are deemed to have been accepted on behalf of the U.S. Government and may not be retained by the employee.  Employees shall, within sixty days of acceptance, deposit the gift for official use with their agency or, if the agency does not have gift acceptance authority, with the Department of State.  Gifts shall be used and disposed of in accordance with State or agency regulations governing property management and disposal.  The designated offices for receiving gifts are:

State

Embassy Administrative Officer

USAID

Mission Executive Officer, or Office of the Director of Administrative Service (M/AS)

Commerce

Office of Organization and Management Support, International Trade Administration

d. Gifts to an employee, spouse, or dependent from foreign government officials are governed by regulations found in 22 CFR Part 3.

e. Gifts of travel expenses are governed by specific agency regulations.

3 FAM 4122.2  Guidance

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

When posts or employees require guidance on dealing with gifts or decorations, they should consult:

State

Office of Protocol

USAID

The Designated Agency Ethics Officer, Office of the General Counsel

3 FAM 4123  RESTRICTIONS ON EMPLOYMENT AND OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES

3 FAM 4123.1  Prohibitions in Any Foreign Country

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

A U.S. citizen employee, spouse, or family member is prohibited from engaging in the following activities while present in any foreign country:

(1)  Speculation in currency exchange;

(2)  Transactions at exchange rates differing from local legally available rates, unless such transactions are duly authorized in advance by the Chief of Mission;

(3)  Sales to unauthorized persons (whether at cost or for profit) of currency acquired at preferential rates through diplomatic or other restricted arrangements;

(4)  Transactions which entail the use of the diplomatic pouch or other official mail without official authorization;

(5)  Transfers of blocked funds in violation of U.S. foreign funds and assets control;

(6)  Independent and unsanctioned private transactions which involve an employee as an individual in violation of applicable currency control regulations of the foreign government; and

(7)  Except as part of official duties, acting as an intermediary in the transfer of private funds from persons in one country to persons in another country, including the United States.

3 FAM 4123.2  Prohibitions in Country of Assignment

3 FAM 4123.2-1  Employment

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

Except as provided in section 3 FAM 4123.2-2 and 3 FAM 4123.2-3, a U.S. citizen employee shall not transact, hold interested in any business, engage for profit in any profession, or undertake other gainful employment in the employee’s own name or the agency of any other person in any country or countries to which the employee is assigned or detailed.

3 FAM 4123.2-2  Employment in Embassy Community

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

A U.S. citizen employee, spouse, or family member may pursue business activities or undertake employment otherwise precluded by section 3 FAM 4123.2-1 where such activities or employment take place solely within the U.S. embassy community.

3 FAM 4123.2-3  Teaching

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

a. A U.S. citizen employee may receive reasonable compensation for teaching if receipt of compensation is not prohibited by 5 CFR 2635.807 and if the course is part of an extension program of an accredited U.S. degree-granting institution or is offered by a private foreign university that is not state-supported and if such teaching is consistent with the local law of the host country.

b. The employee must obtain the approval of the Chief of Mission.  If employed by an agency, other than the Department of State, the employee must also obtain the approval of his or her employing agency.

c.  The request for approval must include:

(1)  A detailed outline of the course to be taught;

(2)  Names of required texts and brief descriptions of other reading material;

(3)  The frequency of classes; and

(4)  The period of time involved.

d. Approval under this section satisfies the requirements of 3 FAM 4175 with respect to teaching abroad.

e. These regulations do not prohibit teaching abroad when compensation is not received so long as the teaching has been approved by the Chief of Mission and, if required, by the employee’s employing agency.

f.  U.S. citizen employees may accept reimbursement for expenses incurred in approved teaching.

3 FAM 4123.2-4  Investments

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

a. A U.S. citizen employee (other than an employee who has been hired locally), a spouse, or family member shall not invest money in:

(1)  Bonds, shares or stock of commercial concerns headquartered in the country of assignment or conducting a substantial portion of their business in such country; or

(2)  In real estate or mortgages on properties located in the employee’s country of assignment, other than the purchases of a house and land for personal occupancy at the time of assignment or at retirement, if approved by the Chief of Mission.

b. Any such investment, if made prior to knowledge of assignment to such country, or if inherited or obtained through marriage, bequest, or gift, may be retained during such assignment, when approved in writing by the Chief of Mission.

c.  If retention is authorized, such investment may not be sold while the employee is assigned or detailed to the country, unless the Chief of Mission approves the sale in writing.

d. Investments held in a qualified trust, certified under the provisions of 5 CFR 2634.401, are exempt from the provisions of this section.

3 FAM 4123.2-5  Personal Property

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

A U.S. citizen employee, spouse, or family member shall not sell, assign or otherwise dispose within a foreign country of personal property (including a motor vehicle) that was imported into, or purchased within that foreign country and that, by virtue of the official status of the employee, was exempt from import limitations, customs duties, or taxes which would otherwise apply, except in accordance with the regulations set forth in 22 CFR Part 136 and the regulations prescribed by the Chief of Mission in that foreign country.

3 FAM 4123.3  Political Activities

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

A U.S. citizen employee, spouse, or family member shall not engage in partisan political activities abroad, other than authorized activities pertaining to U.S. elections.  This provision shall not preclude a locally hired U.S. citizen employee, who also is a national of the country of residence, from exercising political rights deriving from that foreign nationality.

3 FAM 4123.4  Private Organizations; Fundraising

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

a. Approval from both the Chief of Mission and an agency ethics official must be obtained before an employee, spouse, or family member serves as an officer, director, or trustee of any private organization. Chiefs of Mission should obtain such permission from an agency ethics official.

b. With the permission of the Chief of Mission, an employee, spouse, or family member may engage in fundraising for non-profit organizations in an official capacity abroad when such association with private fundraising activities would clearly advance U.S. foreign policy interests while minimizing the appearance of preference or use of public office for private gain.

3 FAM 4123.5  General Conduct

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

An employee shall respect the laws of the country in which the employee is present.

3 FAM 4124  PERSONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR PERSONAL MOTOR VEHICLES

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(State)
(Executive Branch Employees under Authority of Chief of Mission)

a. Chiefs of Mission shall utilize their authority under section 207 of the Foreign Service Act to require that all Executive Branch employees subject to that authority obtain personal liability insurance for their personal motor vehicle(s) and then maintain that insurance for the duration of their tour.

b. The standard for the amount and scope of liability coverage should be that which can reasonably be expected to afford adequate compensation to victims under the local law of the host country.

c.  Care should be taken to avoid policies, which permit the insurer to avoid responsibility by invoking any diplomatic immunity defense of the U.S. driver.

d. Each post should establish and the Chief of Mission should approve guidelines establishing the minimum liability coverage required by members of the Mission.

e. Employees on personal travel outside the host country must maintain adequate private liability insurance in the third state.

3 FAM 4125  OUTSIDE EMPLOYMENT AND ACTIVITIES BY SPOUSES AND FAMILY MEMBERS ABROAD

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

a. A spouse or family member of a U.S. citizen employee may accept any outside employment or undertake other outside activity as described in section 3 FAM 4123 in a foreign country unless such employment:

(1)  Would violate any law of such country;

(2)  Could require a waiver of diplomatic immunity deemed unacceptably broad by the Chief of Mission; or

(3)  Could otherwise damage the interests of the United States as determined by the Chief of Mission in that country.

b. A spouse or family member should notify the principal Administrative Officer at post before acceptance of intended outside employment.

c.  A spouse or family member accepting employment abroad should bear in mind that he or she loses civil immunity from judicial process for activities relating to employment and would be subject to the payment of taxes on income from non-diplomatic employment.

3 FAM 4126  OUTSIDE EMPLOYMENT AND ACTIVITIES OF NON-U.S. CITIZEN EMPLOYEES AND LOCALLY-HIRED U.S. CITIZEN EMPLOYEES

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

a. A non-U.S. citizen employee, and a U.S. citizen employee who has been hired locally must, at the time of hiring, receive approval from the Chief of Mission in order to accept any outside employment or undertake other outside activities as described in section 3 FAM 4123.  Such approval is also required if the employee subsequently proposes to undertake outside employment or other outside activity.

b. Approval will be granted unless the Chief of Mission determines that the employment or activity:

(1)  Would violate any law of such country; or

(2)  Could damage the interests of the United States.

3 FAM 4127  PERSONAL SECURITY PRACTICES

(TL:PER-491;   12-23-2003)
(Uniform State/USAID/Commerce/Foreign Service Corps-USDA)
(Applies to Foreign Service, Foreign Service National, and Civil Service)

a. A terrorist or criminal attack against an employee abroad will harm not just the employee, but also affects others in the Mission, and will hinder the achievement of foreign policy priorities in the host country.  Therefore, it is incumbent on every employee to practice good personal security measures abroad.

b. Employees should implement personal security practices irrespective of the threat level in their country of assignment and employ RSO-recommended measures that may include:

(1)  Varying times and routes to and from work;

(2)  Avoiding demonstrations; and

(3)  Identifying and reporting vehicles or persons possibly involved in surveillance of your activities.

c.  Supervisors and managers should ensure that employees have access to useful information, Department policies, and guidance concerning personal security.  They must also ensure they do not impose working conditions that impede employees from maximizing their personal security.  Examples of working conditions that might be questioned, depending on the threat environment in the country of assignment include:

(1)  Shift changes at the same time every day;

(2)  Regular early-morning staff meetings; and

(3)  Strict adherence to set arrival and departure times.

3 FAM 4128 PERSONAl Domestic WORKER employment

3 FAM 4128.1  Policy and Authority

(CT:PER-804;   02-01-2016)
(Applies to Executive Branch employees under Chief of Mission Authority)

a. Direct-hire Executive Branch employees assigned abroad under Chief of Mission authority are expected to ensure that personal domestic workers employed in their homes are treated fairly and provided employment conditions in accordance with local law and custom, to the extent consistent with 3 FAM 4128. 

b. Personal domestic workers are neither Federal employees nor employees of the U.S. mission.  They are employees of the individual(s) in whose home they work and provide personal services, such as cleaning, cooking, care of children, etc.

c.  The Department expects its employees to treat personal domestic workers in a manner reflecting basic concepts of dignity.  All employees, their family members, and members of household are advised that the use of physical force, threats of force, coercion (including threatened withdrawal of immigration benefits), or fraud to compel labor or sexual services from a personal domestic worker could constitute the crime of trafficking in persons under U.S. law.  Further, all employees are expected to abide by the provisions of their contracts with personal domestic workers. 

d. The following regulations pertain to all personnel under Chief of Mission authority.  Post management may develop a policy to implement these regulations in conjunction with actions required or permitted under local law.  Any such policy must adhere to the regulations contained in this chapter, be compliant with local labor law and be fully consistent with U.S. human rights and anti-trafficking policies. 

3 FAM 4128.2  Employer Responsibility

3 FAM 4128.2-1  Employees Bringing  Personal Domestic Workers to Post

(CT:PER-804;   02-01-2016)
(Applies to Executive Branch employees under Chief of Mission Authority)

All Executive Branch employees assigned abroad under Chief of Mission authority who bring personal domestic workers to post with them (i.e., where personal domestic workers obtain immigration benefits in order to accompany an employee to post) are expected to:

(1)  Enter into a written employment contract with the personal domestic worker before that person requests a visa to travel to post or is otherwise assisted by the mission in coming to or remaining at post;

(2)  Ensure that the contract complies with local law, 3 FAM 4128, and any applicable post policy, including post policy on the form of payment to personal domestic workers.  Contracts must include the following terms:

(a)  Description of duties:  The contract must describe the work to be performed, e.g. housekeeping, gardening, child care, etc.

(b)  Hours of work:  The contract must state the time of the normal working hours and total number of hours worked per week.  A typical work week consists of 35 to 40 hours per week.  The contract must also provide the personal domestic worker with a minimum of at least 1 full day off each week and reflect local law requirements, if any, with regard to paid holidays, sick days, and vacation days.  If local law does not make provision for paid leave in these circumstances, the contract must explicitly state whether such leave will be provided and if so, on what terms. 

(c)  Wages:  The contract must state the hourly/weekly/monthly wage (prevailing or no less than minimum rate) to be paid to the personal domestic worker and the frequency with which the worker will be paid, which must be at least once a month.  It must also state that deductions (e.g., food, lodging, etc.) may not be taken from the wages, except for deductions required by local law (e.g. social security) or requested by the employee (such as repayment of a salary advance) or where such deductions are allowed because the employee who provides lodging pays for the lodging with personal funds.  Employees living in no-cost government-provided housing or in government-subsidized housing may not deduct lodging expenses from wages, nor may they pay a reduced minimum wage for live-in domestic workers, even if such deductions or such a rate is available under local law.  Deductions for lodging or payment of a reduced minimum wage for live-in domestic workers where available under local law are permissible only for employees who provide lodging for domestic workers in housing paid for with personal funds.  The contract must include a provision for severance and/or separation payments on termination of employment, if required by local law.

(d)  Overtime work:  The contract must state that any hours worked in excess of the normal working hours are considered overtime.  The contract must clearly state the rate for overtime work.  The rate for overtime must be at least as much as the hourly rate paid for normal working hours and must be consistent with local law requirements.  Hours the personal domestic worker is required to stay in the residence because he or she has to be “on stand by” are considered work/overtime hours and must be paid as such.  Where local law and contractual terms permit, the employer may authorize compensatory time in lieu of overtime, provided the employee is given sufficient opportunity to utilize compensatory time off that is earned.

(e)  Possession of identity and personal documents:  The contract must state that all identity, travel, and personal documents, including the passport and visa must remain in the sole possession of the personal domestic worker.

(f)   Living conditions:  If the personal domestic worker lives in the residence, the contract must reflect that the employer is obligated to provide adequate and reasonable accommodations.  This will include at a minimum a private bed, access to a bathroom, kitchen facilities, and proper food storage.

(g)  Transportation to and from home country: The contract must state that the employer will pay for the transportation of the personal domestic worker to and from post, unless the worker decides to stay at post and can do so legally.  These costs may not be deducted from the worker’s salary.However, the employer is not responsible for any travel that the domestic worker takes on their own while at post.

(h)  Provide a copy of the signed final contract to the personal domestic worker for his/her records; and

(i)   Submit to the Management Officer or his/her designee a signed declaration indicating that the sponsoring employee has a written contract with the personal domestic worker that meets the standards of 3 FAM 4128, local labor law, and any applicable post policy (see 3 FAM 4128.5 for a sample declaration).  The declaration must be submitted before the mission provides assistance in obtaining a visa for the personal domestic worker or the mission otherwise assists the personal domestic worker in coming to or remaining at post.  Post management may also require submission of the written contract before requesting a personal domestic worker’s visa.

(j)   Maintain contemporaneous records of payment during the assignment.  Employees are encouraged to keep those records for 5 years after the termination of employment, regardless of whether payment is made via electronic transfer, by check, or in cash.  Payment records must indicate the date of payment and amount paid. If payment is made by cash, these records must make clear to both the employer and the personal domestic worker that payment was made and received on said date.

(k)  Adhere to post policy on payment of personal domestic workers.  When feasible and appropriate, post policy shall require payment of salary by check or electronic fund transfer to a local bank account in the name of the personal domestic worker.   

(l)   Ensure that employment contracts are written in English, and, if the worker does not understand English, the contract must also be written in a language s/he understands. The contract must be signed by both the employer and the worker.

3 FAM 4128.2-2  Employees Employing Locally Hired Personal Domestic Workers Abroad

(CT:PER-804;   02-01-2016)
(Applies to Executive Branch employees under Chief of Mission Authority)

a. All Executive Branch employees assigned abroad under Chief of Mission authority who locally hire personal domestic workers to work for more than 20 hours per week (who are either nationals of the receiving state or otherwise authorized to work in that state) are required to have a written contract with such workers that include all the required elements below.

b. All employees who meet the criteria of 3 FAM 4128.2-2(a) are encouraged to keep contemporaneous records of payment during and for up to 5 years after the termination of employment, regardless of whether payment is made via electronic transfer, by check, or in cash.  Payment records must indicate date of payment and amount paid.  If payment is made by cash, these records must make clear to both the employer and the personal domestic worker that payment was made and received on said date.

c.  Adhere to post policy on payment of personal domestic workers.  When feasible and appropriate, post policy shall require payment of salary by check or electronic fund transfer to a local bank account established in the name of the personal domestic worker.

d. Post management should ensure employees are aware of the contractual requirements for personal domestic workers through check-in procedures, management notices, and/or other appropriate means.  Post management may require submission of a signed declaration attesting to compliance with local law, 3 FAM 4128, and any applicable post policy, including post policy on the form of payment to personal domestic workers when entering into an employment contract with locally-hired personal domestic workers, and/or submission of copies of such contracts.

e. All contracts with a locally hired personal domestic worker must be in English.  If the worker does not understand English, the contract must also be written in a language s/he understands. The contract must be signed by both the employer and the worker.

f.  All employment contracts with a locally hired personal domestic worker must be in accordance with local law, 3 FAM 4128, and any applicable post policy, including post policy on the form of payment to personal domestic workers. Contracts must include the following terms:

(1)  Description of duties:  The contract must describe the work to be performed, e.g. housekeeping, gardening, child care, etc.

(2)  Hours of work:  The contract must state the time of the normal working hours and total number of hours worked per week.  A typical work week consists of 35 to 40 hours per week.  The contract must also provide the personal domestic worker with a minimum of at least 1 full day off each week and reflect local law requirements, if any, with regard to paid holidays, sick days, and vacation days. If local law does not make one or more provisions for paid leave in these circumstances, the contract must explicitly state whether such leave will be provided and if so, on what terms. 

(3)  Wages:  The contract must state the hourly/weekly/monthly wage (prevailing or no less than minimum rate) to be paid to the personal domestic worker and the frequency with which the worker will be paid, which must be at least once every month.  It must also state that deductions (e.g., food, lodging, etc.) may not be taken from the wages, except for deductions required by local law (e.g., social security) or requested by the employee (such as repayment of a salary advance) or where such deductions are allowed because the employee who provides lodging pays for the lodging with personal funds. Employees living in no-cost government-provided housing or in government-subsidized housing may not deduct lodging expenses from wages, nor may they pay a reduced minimum wage for live-in domestic workers, even if such deductions or such a rate is available under local law.  Deductions for lodging or payment of a reduced minimum wage for live-in domestic workers where available under local law are permissible only for employees who provide lodging for domestic workers in housing paid for with personal funds.  The contract must include a provision for severance and/or separation payments on termination of employment, if required by local law.

(4)  Overtime work:  The contract must state that any hours worked in excess of the normal working hours are considered overtime. The contract should clearly state the rate for overtime work. The rate for overtime must be at least as much as the hourly rate paid for normal working hours and must be consistent with local law requirements. Hours the personal domestic worker is required to stay in the residence because he or she has to be “on stand by” are considered work/overtime hours and must be paid as such.  Where local law and contractual terms permit, the employer may authorize compensatory time in lieu of overtime, provided the employee is given sufficient opportunity to utilize compensatory time off that is earned.  

(5)  Living conditions:  If the domestic worker lives in the residence, the contract must reflect that the employer is obligated to provide adequate and reasonable accommodations.  This will include at a minimum a private bed, access to a bathroom, kitchen facilities, and proper food storage.

3 FAM 4128.3  Violations and Penalties

(CT:PER-804;   02-01-2016)
(Applies to Executive Branch employees under Chief of Mission Authority)

a. Any abuse or mistreatment of a personal domestic worker, including but not limited to activities which rise to the level of human trafficking, whether such actions are undertaken by an employee, dependent, or member of household is a matter of grave concern to the Department.  Employees engaging in such misconduct will be subject to discipline up to and including removal from employment.  

b. Allegations of abuse and/or mistreatment of a personal domestic worker by U.S. Government employees assigned abroad under Chief of Mission authority, family members, or members of household shall be brought to the attention of post management, including the Regional Security Officer.  The Regional Security Officer, in coordination with the DS Office of Special Investigations, will determine if there is sufficient basis for a criminal or administrative misconduct investigation.  If claims or allegations are substantiated, employees engaging in such conduct may be subject to an administrative penalty and/or referral to the Department of Justice for criminal prosecution for relevant offenses potentially including trafficking in persons.  Depending on the level of immunities, individuals may be subject to local criminal prosecution and/or civil suit.

c.  Section 3271 of Title 18 of the United States Code specifically extends the reach of federal trafficking statutes (including forced labor) to the activities of U.S. employees and those who accompany them abroad:

"Whoever, while employed by or accompanying the Federal Government outside the United States, engages in conduct outside the United States that would constitute an offense under chapter … 117 of this title [peonage, slavery, trafficking in persons] if the conduct had been engaged in within the United States or within the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States shall be punished as provided for that offense.”

d. No U.S. government employee or family member accredited to a foreign government is protected from prosecution by U.S. authorities because he or she may enjoy immunity in  the state in which he or she is assigned abroad.

3 FAM 4128.4  Sponsoring Domestic Staff for Visas to Work in the United States

(CT:PER-804;   02-01-2016)
(Applies to Executive Branch employees under Chief of Mission Authority)

See 9 FAM 402.2.

3 FAM 4128.5  Sample Declaration of compliance

(CT:PER-804;   02-01-2016)

Declaration of Compliance with Local Law and 3 FAM 4128 for Employment of a Personal Domestic Worker Enjoying Immigration Benefits

 

I, _________________, attest that I have read 3 FAM 4128 (Personal Domestic Worker Employment) and understand that I am obligated to comply with the requirements set forth therein.  In particular, I have read the requirements set forth in 3 FAM 4128.2-1 that obligate USG employees under Chief of Mission authority who bring personal domestic workers to post to enter into a written contract with the domestic worker and ensure that the written contract complies with both the FAM and local law.

 

I intend to bring/have already brought  domestic worker to post from abroad to be employed by me as a personal domestic worker.  I understand that the personal domestic worker is not an employee of the U.S. Government or the mission, but is solely employed by me in my personal capacity. 

 

In compliance with 3 FAM 4128, I and ________ [insert name of domestic worker  have entered into a written contract.  I have independently reviewed both the written contract and the relevant FAM provisions, and verify that the written contract is in full compliance with all requirements of 3 FAM 4128.  I have also taken the necessary steps to ensure the contract is in accordance with local law, including obtaining the advice of local legal counsel as appropriate, and verify that the written contract is in full compliance with local law.  I further understand that I am required to exercise due diligence to ensure that the written contract remains in compliance with both the FAM and local law and is amended, consistent with local law, as may be required to ensure continuing compliance. 

 

By signing this declaration of compliance, I hereby certify, to the best of my knowledge and belief, all the information provided by me is true, correct, complete, and made in good faith. 

 

 

 

Name:         _(Type or Print)____________________________________

 

Signature:    _________________________________________________

 

Executed on:_(Insert Date)______________________________________

 

 

3 FAM 4129  Unassigned

Before you can make calls, send texts or access your voicemail when you're abroad, you'll need to make sure you've got international roaming activated on your phone. International roaming is now automatically enabled on our plans, unless you joined us before 22 July 2010 and haven’t roamed abroad since then, in which case you will need to contact us by calling Three Customer Services (before leaving the UK), so we can activate international roaming for you. If you’ve got a new Pay As You Go SIM, make sure you activate it before you go away, as you can’t activate it while abroad.

To check out the standard international roaming charges for the country you’re visiting, go to Roaming Charges and choose your destination.


Calling & texting abroad.

To make a call or send a text to a landline or mobile when you're abroad you'll need to replace the first digit which is normally a 0 with a + symbol, followed by the country calling code. Then enter the rest of the number as normal.

For example, if you're calling or texting the UK the country code is +44, so you should type this followed by the rest of the number, leaving off the first zero. So calling 01567 995000 abroad would be +441567 995000.

Our control your spend blocks don't work when you're abroad, so be aware that calls, texts and data used abroad will be charged outside of your normal monthly cost or allowances. The only exception is if you’re in a Feel At Home destination with a compatible plan.

To find out how much it costs to make calls and send text, picture and video messages abroad, check our international charges.


Checking voicemail abroad.

If you want to use voicemail when you're abroad, you'll need to make sure that you've set up a voicemail security PIN before you go away.

To listen to your voicemail abroad:

  1. Before you go away, make sure you know what your PIN is so that you can access your voicemail when you're out of the country
  2. Dial +447782 333 123
  3. You'll be asked to enter your PIN followed by #
  4. In some countries, you may be asked for your Three phone number and PIN
  5. Select 2 to listen to your voicemail

If you find you can’t remember your voicemail PIN, you may need to reset it. To do this, give us a call on +44 7782 333 333 (standard roaming charges apply).

On our network all calls are automatically diverted to your voicemail for free when you're abroad.

Please be aware that standard roaming charges will apply for listening to your voicemail messages when you're abroad, unless you’re in a Feel At Home destination with a plan that includes Feel At Home, and are using available minutes from your plan or Add-on allowance. Find out more about Feel At Home.

Note: If you’re in the EU/EEA, listening to your voicemail messages will be included in your allowance for all our plans.

To find out how much it costs to use voicemail abroad, go to our price guide.

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *